Social Innovations Journal https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij <p>Social Innovations Journal (SIJ) is dedicated to social innovators and entrepreneurs who work at the cross section between the private sector, government, and not-for-profits and aligns them toward collective social impact goals and public policy.&nbsp; SIJ chronicles social innovations and enterprises addressing the world’s most challenging issues surrounding social policy, leadership, human capital, and systems. In collaboration with government, philanthropy, not-for-profits and universities, the Journal bridges formal research and real-life experience.</p> <p>The mission of the Social Innovations Journal is to promote innovative ideas informed by data and research, incubate social innovation and thought leadership, and to spark a culture of innovation leading to improved social sector products and services, systems and policies.&nbsp; SIJ is creating a new standard for social innovations and enterprise publications by including the “why” behind their innovation, their bottom line impact (social and financial), and the system and policy implications.</p> <p>The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) defines social innovation as a&nbsp;mechanism that “can concern conceptual, process or product change, organizational change and&nbsp;changes in financing, and can deal with new relationships with stakeholders and territories.” The OECD’s&nbsp;Forum on Social Innovation identifies the core components of social innovation as:&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li class="show">“identifying and delivering new services that improve the quality of life of individuals and&nbsp;communities; and&nbsp;</li> <li class="show">“identifying and implementing new labour market integration processes, new competencies,&nbsp;new jobs, and new forms of participation, as diverse elements that each contribute to improving&nbsp;the position of individuals in the workforce.”&nbsp;</li> </ul> <p>In the words of the OECD, <strong>“Social innovation is distinct from economic innovation because it is not&nbsp;about introducing new types of production or exploiting new markets in itself but is about satisfying&nbsp;new needs not provided by the market (even if markets intervene later) or creating new, more&nbsp;satisfactory ways of insertion in terms of giving people a place and a role in production.</strong></p> <p>“The key distinction is that social innovation deals with improving the welfare of individuals and&nbsp;community through employment, consumption or participation, its expressed purpose being therefore&nbsp;to provide solutions for individual and community problems.”</p> en-US nick@socialinnovationspartners.org (Nicholas Torres) nick@socialinnovationspartners.org (Nicholas Torres) Tue, 17 Nov 2020 11:55:53 -0800 OJS 3.2.1.1 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Geriatric Matrix Support for the Family Health Strategy: integrating a Medical Residency Program in Primary Care https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/570 <p>Population aging in Brazil is a fact. More than 70% of the elderly population depend on the Unified Health System (SUS). As the training of health professionals in the area of aging does not keep up with the demand brought by aging, matrix support can be an answer to improve the care provided to this population. The purpose of this article is to show the experience of the geriatrics service at Pedro Ernesto University Hospital of the State University of Rio de Janeiro in the matrix support to the Family Health Strategy, aiming at training the network, professionals, and residents of the Geriatrics Program.</p> Luciana Branco da Motta Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/570 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 Aging Society: Policy Action Recommendations https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/541 <p>The rate of population aging is growing rapidly across the globe requiring governments and health care systems to evolve and align with the needs of older populations. Interprofessional education implementations during training and post-training should be executed to produce teams that can best deliver integrated care. All levels of the government, from international entities to local sovereignties, should coordinate for knowledge sharing and delivery, implementation, and the creation of processes and programs to build age-friendly societies.</p> Sun-Ming Jessica Pan, YI LI Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/541 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 In the Era of New Discoveries Emerging Everyday About Healthy Aging and Complicated Disorders, Elderly Tribal Women of Rural Remote Communities are Living with Treatable Disorders https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/430 <p>Elderly tribal women in villages suffer with disorders which affect their everyday life due to the lack of awareness of the circumstances of living in extreme poverty, the lack of desired health services and social support systems, although their disorders can be easily treated. Objectives were to know the burden of disorders in rural tribal elderly women, their perceptions in a low resource region with extreme poverty .Overall 65% of women had complaints that included vision related 52%, hearing 23%, joints and muscles 19%,, high blood pressure and elevated blood sugar was present in 18% of women, and there were two cases of breast cancer diagnosed. After receiving medical advice and help, 80% of the women took action to improve their health. Overall, 77% of women said that they were satisfied with their life even with extreme poverty. By task, services were shifted to provide sustainable support. Women were apathetic about problems which affected their everyday life in the villages. Many stake holders were involved to help. In this era elderly women in remote villages live with problems were simple solutions are possible to improve their quality life. It is essential to find ways to support women facing these health needs.</p> Shakunatala Chhabra Chhabra Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/430 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 Health of Migrant and Refugees https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/492 <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The globe is experiencing unprecedented migration, and the populations of migrants and refugees are only expected to increase. This rapid increase of population movement has important public health implications, and therefore requires an adequate governmental response. This paper introduces promising practices that can assist governments in implementing initiatives to promote the health of immigrant and refugee populations.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mengchun Zhou, Julia Lechuga, Akiko Maeda, Arthur Kaufman, Laura Parajon Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/492 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 Community-based Health Insurance Among Refugees in Rwanda https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/469 <p>Refugees are at high risk of experiencing limited health access and being exposed to diseases prevalent in conditions where there is poor sanitation, hunger, poverty, and over crowdedness. Despite these challenges refugees deserves full access to health services. Refugees in Rwanda experience these problems to various degrees. The government, refugees’ agencies, and nonprofit organizations have been responding accordingly to improve the well-being of refugees living in Rwanda.</p> Eric MUGABO Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/469 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 Eradicating the Pandemic of Violence against Women (VaW) during COVID-19: the critical imperative for health https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/485 <p>Prior to COVID-19, the #The MeToo movement took the world by storm, exposing the extreme suffering of women at the hands of abusers. The United Nations (UN) has described Violence Against Women (VaW) as “perhaps the most shameful human rights violation” VaW is a longstanding global public health problem which has been ignored despite the efforts of many. Survivors of VaW are facing disproportionate consequences due to COVID-19 and resulting lockdowns and economic hardship worldwide. As a result of COVID-19, the reality of significant morbidity and mortality is gaining more attention, particularly as VaW is increasing. In this policy brief, we address issues related to VaW and COVID-19 through a social justice lens that applies a feminist anti-racism analytical framework.</p> <p>We argue that this critical time period can be used to catalyze long lasting changes to prevent and mitigate VaW through comprehensive short and long term policy measures related to education, research, media coverage, legislation, policing, social work and so forth.&nbsp; It is urgent that governments everywhere make women and children safety an immediate priority through the provision of safe housing, food security, healthcare and retraining for livelihoods.&nbsp; The pandemic of VaW must never be silenced again and movements such as #MeToo ought to be supported to promulgate effective human right changes that lead to systemic and institutional justice. Because of the intensification of VaW during this time, Covid-19 offers the world the opportunity to eradicate VaW once and for all.</p> <p>Eradicating VaW is a complex endeavor which requires buy-in from all sectors.&nbsp; Here, we consider the complex intersection of issues creating the current climate of heightened violence against women during Covid-19. Global leaders in government, business, and other sectors, in addition to local community members, ought to make efforts to protect women’s lives and shift the public narrative related to VaW. Empowering boys and men to prevent and combat VaW is a critical part of this work. Toxic masculinity, which is defined as widely accepted gender norms about men’s authority and men’s use of violence to exert control over women, is one of the deadly roots of VaW.&nbsp; Everyone on the gender spectrum has a role to play in ending the deadly pandemic of VaW.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> Ephraim Kumi Senkyire , Farah Shroff, Isabelle Luzuriaga Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/485 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 EVERY WOMAN COUNTS, FIGHTING PREGNANCY-RELATED SEPSIS https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/422 <p>Maternal sepsis remains one of the major causes of maternal deaths worldwide, despite progress made to reduce maternal mortality rates; roughly 300,000 women worldwide still die due to pregnancy-related complications every year.<br>Following the WHO anti-sepsis recommendations, our team took an implementation initiative to build innovations to achieve change and witness a drop in MMR through the awareness of the health workers.<br>Integrating the 2016 WHO recommendations into our facility (ASUMH, Cairo-Egypt) standard practice and highlighting the evidence-based practices as effective innovations we were able to track change; 25% to 88% of our staff adopted new practice behavior following our implementation plan. (P-value &gt;0.05 NS; p-value &lt;0.05 S; p-value &lt;0.001 HS)<br>We believe that through learning and education, our staff can maintain the improvement cycles and constructively deliver the best-practice methods to our patients. </p> Dr. Sandra Dimitri, Dr. Rania Hassan Ahmed, Dr. Mohamed Hamed Salama, Prof. Dr. Ashraf Nabhan Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/422 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 The Role of Medical Students at the University of Gezira in Promoting Women’s Health in the Gezira State https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/465 <p> Women's health in Sudan is considered fairly good, and most of the reasons that lead to the deterioration of women's health especially reproductive health results from social beliefs, concepts, and norms. This article aims to present the role of medical students of Gezira University in promoting women's health. The youth have an important role in promoting women's health in Sudan especially the medical students because they work to establish student organizations to empower women in the community to take care of the issues that improve their health. In addition, the students help to increase the effectiveness of the local women's participation in the community, and help to create partnerships with external initiatives and organizations that conduct health projects and awareness campaigns to further promote the health and wellbeing of women. </p> Mohammed Ahmed AL_mogadam Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/465 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 The Genesis and Revelation on Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC): What We Know So Far and What We Expect to Know in the Future from Ghanaian Perspectives https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/443 <p>Despite initiation of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) in Ghana since 2007, there is still poor knowledge and practices among Ghanaians' on implementation even at the tertiary hospitals. In 2017, while working at the Cape Coast Teaching Hospital, observations were made of mothers with preterm babies who had spent one to two weeks in the NICU and were discharged to the pediatric ward for continued KMC. It was observed that mothers, both young and old, were ignorant of KMC. Thus the objective of this article was to find what is known on KMC and also what is expected in the future from the Ghanaian perspective. The methodology used were reviews from previous literature that used various search engines to retrieve information on Ghanaian perspectives. In conclusion, it was recommended that future research should use a mix of methodology to generate large volumes of data for generalization to the wider population since research on KMC in Ghana is only confined to a single setting and mainly uses qualitative methods.</p> EPHRAIM KUMI SENKYIRE Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/443 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 Maternal Mortality Reduction in Low-resource Settings, A Successful Story of University of Gezira Initiative for Safe Motherhood and Childhood https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/491 <p>The scope and aim of this study are to review our experience in maternal mortality reduction in Gezira State, Sudan in a major health project initiated by the University of Gezira, Sudan in 2005, as a low-resource setting in Africa. The evidence was related to village midwifes, rural hospitals, the cause of maternal mortality, available obstetrics resources, equipment, manpower, and training in all hospitals in the region. Interventions led to a remarkable reduction in the maternal mortality ratio. The Safe Motherhood initiative is an ideal program of social accountability for medical school to meet their community's needs in a scientific way.</p> Elhadi Miskeen Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/491 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 Maternal Health Education Mini-project in Sudan https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/419 <p>The maternal health situation in Sudan is particularly important and it's considered good while it is still progressing. Due to many reasons, the health of Sudanese women and young girls, in underserved communities i.e. rural areas and villages particularly, is heavily compromised. However, we came to understand the need for health education and health awareness campaigns in villages.</p> <p>We came up with the idea of of presenting an initiative of a maternal health promotive/educational campaign in a small village population. The purpose of this idea was basically to assess the degree of awareness about reproductive health, to raise community empowerment, social accountability, and to help by offering this population health care welfare, promote international maternal health standards, and provide guidance and support to health systems for making motherhood safer. The idea was created and developed over the course of Interdisciplinary Field Training, Research, and Rural Development Program (IFTRRDP) assigned by the University of Gezira, Faculty of Medicine, Sudan.</p> Ala Khalid Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/419 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 The Influence, Choice and Use of Contraceptives by teenage girls in Sunyani west district, Ghana. https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/445 <p>Estimations are that in Ghana, 21% of young girls are mothers by the time they are 18 years old. Unplanned pregnancies among young girls occur mainly due to lack of knowledge about sexuality issues and inappropriate use or non-use of contraceptives. The aim of the study was to determine what influences the choice and use of contraceptives by teenagers in Sunyani west district and suggest ways of improving contraceptive use. The study design was exploratory, descriptive and quantitative. Simple random sampling was used to select respondents from the lists of pregnant teenagers and those having a baby or babies provided by professional nurses in specific health care centers selected for the study. Data was collected by means of a structured questionnaire during respondents’ normal routine visit to the designated health care centers.</p> <p>Results revealed that partner preference 36.62%, absence of side effects 22.54% and ease of use 12.65% influenced the choice of and use of contraceptives by respondents. Slightly less than half the number of respondents used condoms 46.77%, oral pill 20.97%, the same proportion of 20.97% used emergency contraceptives and 4.48% &nbsp;used injectables. Main sources of contraceptive information were school teachers, 31.16%, with family members being the least 10.39%. Reasons for discontinuing the use of contraceptives, resulting in pregnancy included side effects 35.62%, partner dislike 32.88% and high cost of contraceptives 9.5%. Respondents suggested various ways to improve contraceptive use and susequently reduce unplanned pregnancies.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Todd Nursing Maja Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/445 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 Building A Primary Care Center Through Interdisciplinary Collaboration https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/474 <p>La Posta Sanitaria "Las Lilas" is a social promotion and extension project, founded in 2007 by the Biomedical School of the Austral University, in Argentina. There is an interdisciplinary team of health professionals, including specialties such as: medical clinic, nursing, pediatrics, gynecology and obstetrics, social work and psychology. This project has its roots in the institutional mission of the University to serve society, and its main goal is to promote and guarantee the individual and collective health of the community through the integral development of people. In order to generate a greater link between the faculty and the rest of the University, in 2015 we invited students from other disciplines to La Posta. The project is enriched by including contributions from other disciplines. It demonstrated that undergraduate and graduate students can share motivations, concerns, and together contribute to solving the problems of a vulnerable community while offering opportunities to improvement La Posta. </p> María de la Paz Grebe, Angel Centeno, Campos Soledad Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/474 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 A Case Study of Canada’s Rural Practice Training 21st-Century Journey https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/423 <p>Canada is a vast country with about one-fifth of its 37 million people living in rural areas. Many of those, especially Indigenous Canadians living in remote communities, face serious challenges accessing equitable healthcare. Dedicated general practitioners/family physicians have provided most of the generalist medical care in rural and remote communities with specialist care and resources most often limited or distant. There have always been some medical schools that have provided exceptional training for physicians to practice in rural communities. Since 2000, there has been more focus (and progress) on the development of rural training pathways to develop more physicians with both the interest and appropriate skills for rural generalist practice.</p> <p>While recognizing that the pathways to rural practice begin before medical school, and extend into practice, this case study will focus on postgraduate vocational residency training for rural family practice. It will highlight the challenges and successes of the significant policy, planning and program steps along that journey with particular attention to the roles of the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) and the Society of Rural Physicians of Canada (SRPC). The interplay of medical education and healthcare delivery is complex. For meaningful progress, collaboration is vital, but it is a challenge to achieve. Indeed, collaborative multi-stakeholder action is the essential innovative solution in the development of the rural training pathways in Canada.&nbsp;</p> Dr James Rourke, Dr. Ruth Wilson, Dr. Ivy Oandasan, Ms. Carmela Bosco Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/423 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800 Mother and Child Health Suffers in Remote Villages with Extreme Poverty, Possibilities of Sustainable Services for Survival https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/433 <p>Elderly tribal women in villages suffer with disorders which affect their everyday life due to the lack of awareness of the circumstances of living in extreme poverty, the lack of desired health services and social support systems, although their disorders can be easily treated. Objectives were to know the burden of disorders in rural tribal elderly women, their perceptions in a low resource region with extreme poverty .Overall 65% of women had complaints that included vision related 52%, hearing 23%, joints and muscles 19%,, high blood pressure and elevated blood sugar was present in 18% of women, and there were two cases of breast cancer diagnosed. After receiving medical advice and help, 80% of the women took action to improve their health. Overall, 77% of women said that they were satisfied with their life even with extreme poverty. By task, services were shifted to provide sustainable support. Women were apathetic about problems which affected their everyday life in the villages. Many stake holders were involved to help. In this era elderly women in remote villages live with problems were simple solutions are possible to improve their quality life. It is essential to find ways to support women facing these health needs.</p> Shakunatala Chhabra Chhabra Copyright (c) 2020 Social Innovations Journal https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/433 Tue, 17 Nov 2020 00:00:00 -0800