Social Innovations Journal https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij <p>Social Innovations Journal (SIJ) is dedicated to social innovators and entrepreneurs who work at the cross section between the private sector, government, and not-for-profits and aligns them toward collective social impact goals and public policy. SIJ chronicles social innovations and enterprises addressing the world’s most challenging issues surrounding social policy, leadership, human capital, and systems. In collaboration with government, philanthropy, not-for-profits and universities, the Journal bridges formal research and real-life experience.</p> <p><strong>Social Innovations Journal (SIJ) provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater exchange of knowledge.</strong></p> <p><strong>This journal is open access journal which means that all content is freely available without charge to users or / institution. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to full text articles in this journal without asking prior permission from the publisher or author as long as acknowledge the original author as stated in the Creative Commons License. </strong></p> <p><strong><a href="https://socialinnovationsjournal.org/editions">Please Visit THE SOCIAL INNOVATIONS JOURNAL ARCHIVES (EDITIONS 1 - 55) HERE</a></strong></p> <p><a href="https://socialinnovationsjournal.org/index.php/more/get-involved"><strong>BECOME A MEMBER OF THE SOCIAL INNOVATIONS JOURNAL for ACCESS to SYMPOSIUMS, WORKSHOPS, and COURSES</strong></a></p> <p>The mission of the Social Innovations Journal is to promote innovative ideas informed by data and research, incubate social innovation and thought leadership, and to spark a culture of innovation leading to improved social sector products and services, systems and policies. SIJ is creating a new standard for social innovations and enterprise publications by including the “why” behind their innovation, their bottom line impact (social and financial), and the system and policy implications.</p> <p>The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) defines social innovation as a mechanism that “can concern conceptual, process or product change, organizational change and changes in financing, and can deal with new relationships with stakeholders and territories.” The OECD’s Forum on Social Innovation identifies the core components of social innovation as: </p> <ul> <li class="show">“identifying and delivering new services that improve the quality of life of individuals and communities; and </li> <li class="show">“identifying and implementing new labour market integration processes, new competencies, new jobs, and new forms of participation, as diverse elements that each contribute to improving the position of individuals in the workforce.” </li> </ul> <p>In the words of the OECD, <strong>“Social innovation is distinct from economic innovation because it is not about introducing new types of production or exploiting new markets in itself but is about satisfying new needs not provided by the market (even if markets intervene later) or creating new, more satisfactory ways of insertion in terms of giving people a place and a role in production.</strong></p> <p>“The key distinction is that social innovation deals with improving the welfare of individuals and community through employment, consumption or participation, its expressed purpose being therefore to provide solutions for individual and community problems.”</p> <p><strong>Open Access, Licensing, and Copyright</strong> </p> <p>The Social Innovations Journal is loyal open access for academic work, permitting any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of its articles and to use them for any other lawful purpose. 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The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as <a id="publicity_privacy_or_moral_rights_popup" class="helpLink" tabindex="0" title="" href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/" data-original-title="">publicity, privacy, or moral rights</a> may limit how you use the material</li> </ul> <h3><strong>Copyright and Publishing Rights </strong></h3> <p>For the licenses indicated above, authors retain the copyright and full publishing rights without restrictions.</p> </div> <p> </p> en-US <div id="deed-conditions" class="row"> <h3><strong>The Social Innovations Journal permits the Creative Commons License:</strong></h3> <h2><span class="cc-license-title">Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported</span> <span class="cc-license-identifier">(CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)</span></h2> <h3>Under the following terms:</h3> <ul class="license-properties col-md-offset-2 col-md-8" dir="ltr"> <li class="license by"> <p><strong>Attribution</strong> — You must give <a id="appropriate_credit_popup" class="helpLink" tabindex="0" title="" href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/" data-original-title="">appropriate credit</a>, provide a link to the license, and <a id="indicate_changes_popup" class="helpLink" tabindex="0" title="" href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/" data-original-title="">indicate if changes were made</a>. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.<span id="by-more-container"></span></p> </li> <li class="license nc"> <p><strong>NonCommercial</strong> — You may not use the material for <a id="commercial_purposes_popup" class="helpLink" tabindex="0" title="" href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/" data-original-title="">commercial purposes</a>.<span id="nc-more-container"></span></p> </li> <li class="license nd"> <p><strong>NoDerivatives</strong> — If you <a id="some_kinds_of_mods_popup" class="helpLink" tabindex="0" title="" href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/" data-original-title="">remix, transform, or build upon</a> the material, you may not distribute the modified material.<span id="nd-more-container"></span></p> </li> </ul> </div> <div class="row"> <ul id="deed-conditions-no-icons" class="col-md-offset-2 col-md-8"> <li class="license"><strong>No additional restrictions</strong> — You may not apply legal terms or <a id="technological_measures_popup" class="helpLink" tabindex="0" title="" href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/" data-original-title="">technological measures</a> that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.</li> </ul> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-offset-1 col-md-10"><hr /></div> </div> <div id="deed-understanding" class="row"> <h3>Notices:</h3> <ul class="understanding license-properties col-md-offset-2 col-md-8"> <li class="license">You do not have to comply with the license for elements of the material in the public domain or where your use is permitted by an applicable <a id="exception_or_limitation_popup" class="helpLink" tabindex="0" title="" href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/" data-original-title="">exception or limitation</a>.</li> <li class="license">No warranties are given. The license may not give you all of the permissions necessary for your intended use. For example, other rights such as <a id="publicity_privacy_or_moral_rights_popup" class="helpLink" tabindex="0" title="" href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/" data-original-title="">publicity, privacy, or moral rights</a> may limit how you use the material</li> </ul> <h3><strong>Copyright and Publishing Rights </strong></h3> <p>For the licenses indicated above, authors retain the copyright and full publishing rights without restrictions. </p> </div> nick@socialinnovationspartners.org (Nicholas Torres) nick@socialinnovationspartners.org (Nicholas Torres) Wed, 25 Jan 2023 04:21:54 -0800 OJS 3.3.0.10 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 How Possible is it to Eliminate FGM? https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5373 <p style="font-weight: 400;">Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a traditional cultural practice that is predominantly practiced in Africa. Nigeria accounts for 10% of the 200 million reported cases of FGM around the world. Studies have shown that FGM has no health benefits and poses harmful short- and long-term health complications (WHO 2020). The communities that continue the practice believe that they are protecting the purity and virtues of their girls and women from sexual promiscuous behavior leading to stigma and family shame. Based on the research and data that is currently available, the number of communities that still practice FGM in Nigeria is decreasing at a slow rate. The content of this paper will be useful for addressing gaps that are missing or overlooked by providing recommendations to reduce the amount of FGM practice. This paper will explore the myths about FGM, the reasoning behind why it is practiced, the barriers that sustain these myths and/or ways of reasoning, and recommendations for addressing these social barriers/ myths to spread more awareness about the harmful effects of the practice.</p> Boluwaji Olaniru, Ph.D. (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Boluwaji Olaniru, PhD (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5373 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 Social Innovation in Colombia: https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5374 <p>Social innovation is often linked to a sustainable future, as well as the generation of new ideas, services, and products to address social and environmental challenges. Colombia's social and environmental challenges include poverty, inequality, armed conflict, and deforestation. These challenges have been hard to address due to regulatory and economic barriers such as the Colombian Land Reform. Nevertheless, some individuals and organizations have been developing innovative approaches to overcome these issues.&nbsp;This paper provides an overview of some of the Colombian challenges with inequality and the environment. It explains why Colombian land reform initiatives have created barriers for Colombians to innovatively address these social challenges. It concludes with a discussion about opportunities Colombians might have to overcome their structural barriers to social change and provides examples of successful initiatives.</p> Maira Cristina Castro Mina (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Maira Cristina Castro Mina (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5374 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 Diagnosing the Social Innovation Challenge in Universities https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5378 <p style="font-weight: 400;">This opinion piece emerges from a talk given at the Ashoka Changemaker Education Research Forum in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in September 2022, in response to an invitation for researchers, practitioners, and students to share experiences highlighting cultural, geopolitical, and structural barriers to social innovation. Premised on the urgency of profound and cascading global social challenges, the article is a practice-informed reflection on what components universities struggle with in delivering strong social innovation learning – including interdisciplinarity, systems thinking, changemaking orientations, and deep community engagement. The evolutionary layers of the human brain are used as analogs for the evolutionary layers of the university, from monastic cloisters to modern market-oriented, research-driven institutions. Informed specifically by the Canadian public university context, this article concludes on a hopeful note, musing about how nascent efforts to decolonize and indigenize the academy potentially hold the most promise for reforming and retrofitting universities to be substantially better equipped to nurture social innovation learning.</p> James Stauch (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 James Stauch (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5378 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 The Human Rights Scholar’s Acknowledgement: https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5381 <p style="font-weight: 400;">The Human Rights Scholar’s Acknowledgement (HRSA) explores the intentional development and grounding of the human rights learner. It builds on a learner’s personal declaration toward humility and responsibility in the acquiring and stewardship of knowledge. Knowledge that is often connected to the traumas and continued resilience of the oppressed. The HRSA challenges human rights learners to be introspective. In doing so, it asks them to make connections to wisdom teachings and tenets present within their own communities and lived experiences. Grounding of the learner through this declaration nurtures transformative social innovation and changemaking connected to knowledge stewardship. Thus, the learner is better able to transcend from a learning space of surface knowledge to that of deep wisdom.</p> Rochele Padiachy (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Rochele Padiachy (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5381 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 A Map of Social Innovation Territories: https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5375 <div> <p><span lang="EN-US">This paper offers a visual map of the landscape of social innovation to help clarify assumptions, overcome biases, and learn new approaches for making social and environmental changes in the 21<sup>st</sup> century. </span><span lang="EN-US">The map is </span><span lang="EN-US">a wayfinding tool to aid exploration, communication, and collaboration across sectors and worldviews. The map is oriented around different epistemologies (ways of knowing) and ontologies (ways of being), which carve out two key territories: </span><span lang="EN-US">(1) mainstream liberal social entrepreneurship (aligned with positivist epistemologies (western science); and (2) complexity-based models characterized by relational ways of being and calling for plural knowledges. We note (3) a rift across this landscape – formed by fault lines of positivist/non-positivist epistemologies and dualist/non-dualist ontologies. </span><span lang="EN-US">We explain how to use the map to locate your position, navigate, and explore new places. We point out bridges across barriers, including complexity thinking, design thinking, and attention to power. </span></p> </div> Laura L. Murphy, Maille E. Faughnan (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Laura L. Murphy, Maille E. Faughnan (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5375 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 Changemaker Talent Exchange & Impact Ecosystem™ https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5384 <div> <p class="xmsonormal"><span lang="EN-US">Higher education must develop the knowledge, skills, and perspectives that enable individuals and communities to adapt and thrive. As change, volatility, complexity, and ambiguity become the norm, educational institutions must adapt. They must help everyone become “changemakers” – able to take creative action to solve complex problems. Changemaking skills are increasingly becoming important for success in life, work, and careers. Ashoka: Innovators for the Public is developing a Changemaker Talent Exchange and Impact Ecosystem<sup>TM</sup>. This paper will provide an overview of the three key components of the system: Changemaker Talent, Changemaker Solutions, and New Institutions. Its three areas of action include improving navigation, validation, and acceleration; the three ways this system will address current challenges and disconnects between higher education and the workforce. It will do so by providing a clear roadmap for a lifelong learning strategy, innovative models for credentialling, and tools for communication and translation of skills developed through the formal higher education process and beyond.</span></p> </div> Bob Spoer, Heather MacCleoud, Ph.D. (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Bob Spoer, Heather MacCleoud (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5384 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 Designing Changemaker Education for Greater Life Satisfaction https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5377 <p style="font-weight: 400;">The Amani Institute’s Social Innovation Management (SIM) post-graduate certificate has helped changemakers build skills and gain tools to address social challenges and create a positive impact. Burn-out and loneliness, however, can be barriers for changemakers to do so. Hence, one of the most important impact and success indicators to ensure that the changemakers participating in the program can do this work while maintaining well-being is the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). Through intentionally designing the program to promote life satisfaction, the SIM Changemakers have consistently shown statistically significant improvement in SWLS scores at the end of the program indicating improved life satisfaction and well-being.</p> Stephanie Haase, Ph.D. (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Stephanie Haase, Ph.D. (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5377 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 Maximizing the Impact of Changemaker Education: https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5383 <p style="font-weight: 400;">This paper considers the major themes that emerged from a multi-case study examining the impact of integrating changemaker education into the business school curriculum at Royal Roads University. More specifically, research findings shedding light on practices and contexts that contribute to the development of positive sustainability orientations are discussed. Findings include the importance of discipline-specific changemaking coursework, powerful pedagogies, passionate instructors, and a supportive hidden curriculum. The importance of introducing students to conceptualizations of sustainability rooted in stronger perspectives is also discussed.</p> Lois Fearon (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Lois Fearon (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5383 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 Higher Education, a Time for New Decisions: https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5387 <div> <p class="Default"><span lang="EN-US">The accumulation of events and decisions that have shaped the current reality of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) opens an opportunity for these institutions to reimagine how they deliver their proposition to society. Knowingly, collaboration and partnerships as cross-sector work have been considered essential to address the complexities of our most pressing societal problems. Leadership at different levels of these institutions are exploring and supporting the co-design of alternative solutions and social change through civic engagement. However, the participation of members of marginalized communities at the co-creation level is still scarce. This paper draws from examples of global social innovation and systems change in the HEI context. It suggests that the inclusion and integration of the perspectives of practitioners and community members with the closest proximity to society’s most pressing challenges presents a mutual opportunity, potentially promoting more effective innovation and social impact.</span></p> </div> Eidi Cruz Valdivieso (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Eidi Cruz Valdivieso (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5387 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 When Local Isn’t Global: https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5376 <p style="font-weight: 400;">While research on how healthcare organizations implement innovations exists, less scholarship describes how organizational origins influence innovation choices. A multi-year and multi-organizational study on the healthcare system in Repiblik Ayiti (Haiti) was conducted from 2017 to 2021. The study reveals a consistent difference between the arc of the journey of the foreign-funded healthcare ventures versus that of the locally-founded healthcare ventures. We find that origin (local vs. foreign-founded) can influence the pace and sequence of innovation. Both approaches are needed to address gaps in access to care at the bottom of the pyramid. This article examines how context informs the innovation approach and how our findings may influence curricula and program development for social innovation and entrepreneurship educators.</p> Rebecca Obounou, Wiljeana Glover, Ph.D. (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Rebecca Obounou, Wiljeana Glover, Ph.D (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5376 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 Challenging Barriers to Fundraising Culture: https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5372 <p style="font-weight: 400;">This paper addresses the following questions: <em>How can social entrepreneurs from communities historically excluded from capital better understand how to access capital? </em>Given that the predominant discourse in fundraising culture is centered on the needs of funders and not of founders, how can social entrepreneurs design pathways that fit the scale and reach of their vision? Ownership Wayfinding is a novel workshop method whereby social entrepreneurs explore different organizational types and capital sources. This includes a series of workshops that address: (1) a future visioning exercise; (2) a discussion of ownership intentions; (3) the exploration of organizational types and capital expectations; (4) a reflection on different wealth-creation and risk tolerance motivations; and (5) the design of organizational options and scenarios. The method has been used successfully by graduate and undergraduate social entrepreneurship students who gain greater agency in the fundraising process by understanding organizational structure and capital alternatives.</p> Jen van der Meer (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Jen van der Meer (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5372 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 Humanitarian Innovation Funding Mapping: https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5380 <p>Deep-rooted colonialism is one of the most significant problems plaguing the humanitarian sector today. Humanitarian innovation in the Global North is associated with multiple approaches such as human-centred design, lean start-up and integrated innovation. These approaches are heavily influenced by Silicon Valley concepts based on market-based ideologies emphasizing technology, access, economic efficiency, business models and potential for scaling up geographical breadth. Using these concepts of innovation exclusively without being inclusive of a more globally informed approach widens the gap of existing inequity. Having dominant innovation funding largely committed to and from organizations in the Global North systematically fuels existing inequality gaps. In view of this, humanitarian innovation funders are constantly challenged to reflect on how they perpetuate a system of inequity and what they can do to change it. This is largely responsible for the sector-wide transition in the last decade in focusing on innovation in humanitarian response. Auspiciously, humanitarian innovation has been one emerging way to solve humanitarian problems. However, innovators are largely from Global North, which does not give room for innovators from Global South to emerge with locally driven solutions. As a result, several innovative approaches to global humanitarian challenges have emerged in various sectors with dominance in technology, health, education, and climate change.</p> Aanu Ighagbon (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Aanu Ighagbon (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5380 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 Advancing and Measuring the Impact of Changemaker (Social Innovation) Education https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5379 <p style="font-weight: 400;">The last 20 years have seen the emergence of social innovation as a field of study with its genesis in multiple disciplines, theoretical perspectives, and practices. As the societal, environmental, and economic challenges of the 21<sup>st</sup> Century become increasingly complex, the need for new thinking, skills, and capabilities to facilitate social innovation that not only tackles these challenges but enhances societies' capacity to act increases. The role of education as a major contributor in creating this new paradigm has come under scrutiny, with attention paid to how social innovation is taught, the skills and competencies social innovation education develops, and the impact such pedagogies and curricula have in developing students as Changemakers equipped to tackle these challenges. The Changemaker Education Research Forum (CERF) held in Nova Scotia between 17<sup>th</sup> and 18<sup>th</sup> September 2022 provided a unique opportunity to undertake a deep dive into many of the themes surrounding post-18 secondary social innovation education, exploring the rich seam of practice and research, moving this field forward. This article presents personal reflections on the papers and discussion that emerged in Stream 1 of the forum, the development of social innovation education, and the advances made in the research attempting to measure the impact of such education. These reflections provide an overview of the stream and introduce the varied and thought-provoking papers presented by researchers, students, and practitioners who took part.</p> Wray Irwin, Ph.D., Matthew Nash (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Wray Irwin, Ph.D., Matthew Nash (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5379 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800 Cultural, Geopolitical, and Structural Barriers to Social Innovation https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5386 <p style="font-weight: 400;">Cultural, geopolitical, and structural barriers prevent many social innovation initiatives from achieving their desired impact. These barriers include social pressures, regulatory burdens, lack of resources (funding, people, knowledge), and inequitable power structures. Fortunately, there are many ways to overcome these barriers – including judicious engagement with higher education. In order to build a world where “everyone is a changemaker,” Ashoka has hosted an annual changemaker education research forum (CERF). Ashoka’s 2022 CERF was designed to create the conditions for deeper collaboration and knowledge-sharing amongst the Changemaker network and beyond. This paper is an overview of one of the streams (areas of inquiry) presented at CERF 2022 and enhanced throughout this issue of the <em>Social Innovations Journal (SIJ).</em> The focus of this stream was <em>Cultural, Geopolitical, and Structural Barriers to Social Innovation. </em>The research was focused on three interrelated areas: education and responsible knowledge production, international perspectives and development, and finally, the complicated relationship between social innovations at the local vs. global level.</p> Heather MacCleoud, Ph.D. (Author) Copyright (c) 2023 Heather MacCleoud (Author) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 https://socialinnovationsjournal.com/index.php/sij/article/view/5386 Wed, 25 Jan 2023 00:00:00 -0800